Spring wildflowers

Spring

Spring wildflowers

© Neil Aldridge

Spring into bloom

Surrey is the most wooded county in England and spring signals the arrival of stunning carpets of beautiful bluebells and other woodland wildflowers. Some of the best displays of these much-loved flowers can be found in woodlands managed by Surrey Wildlife Trust.

Surrey's spring wildflowers

Look out for the following spring wildflowers in Surrey's woodlands.

Bluebells

In April and May, our ancient woodlands are awash with the much-loved, nodding heads of the Bluebell. Millions of bulbs can exist in just one wood, giving rise to the 'blue carpets' that are a springtime joy.

Bluebell wood

© Guy Edwardes/2020VISION

Cowslip

Surrey's county flower and one of our most familiar spring flowers, the cowslip brightens up ancient meadows and woodlands with its egg-yolk-yellow, nodding blooms. Look out for stunning displays of this beautiful flower on Cowslip Meadow, Sheepleas.

Cowslip

© Guy Edwardes/2020VISION

Wood anemone

A spring delight, the wood anemone grows in dappled shade in ancient woodlands. Traditional management, such as coppicing, can help such flowers by opening up the woodland floor to sunlight.

Wood anemone

© Jim Higham

Early purple orchid

The Early Purple Orchid is one of the first orchids to pop up in spring. Look for its pinkish-purple flowers from April, when bluebells still carpet our woodland floors. Its leaves are dark green with dark spots.

Early purple orchids

© Jim Higham

Primrose

In mild years, the spring-flowering primrose can appear as early as December. Look out for its pretty, creamy-yellow flowers in woodlands and grasslands.

Primrose

© Don Sutherland

Lesser celandine

Heralding spring, a carpet of sunshine-yellow Lesser Celandine flowers is a joy to see on a woodland walk. Look out for it along hedgerows, in parks and even in graveyards, too, from March onwards.

Lesser celandine

© Ross Hoddinott/2020VISION

Common dog-violet

Our most familiar wild violet, the Common Dog-violet can be spotted in a range of habitats from woodland to grassland, hedgerows to pastures. Its pansy-like, purple flowers appear from April to June.

Common dog-violet

© Chris Gomersall/2020VISION

Ramsons

In April and May, our ancient woodlands are awash with the white, starry flowers and garlic smell of Ramsons. Millions of bulbs can exist in just one wood, giving rise to dazzling 'white carpets'.

Wild garlic

© Ross Hoddinott/2020VISION

Yellow archangel

As the Bluebells fade, Yellow Archangel takes its turn to impress, with golden-yellow flowers carpeting our ancient woodlands. Although it is from the dead-nettle family, it does not sting.

Yellow archangel

© Paul Lane

Lady's smock

Lady’s smock is also commonly known as cuckoo flower, because it coincides with the arrival of the first cuckoo. This pretty perennial loves damp places and can be found on wet grassland, ditch edges and roadside verges.

Lady's smock

© Karen Lloyd

Top sites for spring wildflowers

Species A-Z

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© Terry Whittaker/2020VISION

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